Gordon & MacPhail Rare Vintage

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Time to bring out The Good Stuff. Gordon & Macphail have kindly released a set of five samples from their superb Rare Vintage range just for us lucky Tweet Tasters to tuck into.

Gordon & Macphail have been bottling whisky in Speyside for over a hundred years. A proud family-run business, their back catalog of casks is mind-boggling. More than most bottlers, they’re really able to produce some exceptionally unusual vintages that give us mere mortals the chance to taste whisky from distilleries we know and love but in a much different, older form.

We’ll be starting in 1985 and winding the time machine back through the decades, all the way to 1954. What a treat this is. We begin our journey in the Highlands…

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Balblair 1985

Casks: Two bourbon refills
Age: 30 years old
Distilled: 14th January 1985
Bottled: 27th January 2015
ABV: 43%

We start off with the youngest of the five, a mere whippersnapper at 30 years old. Fun fact – I was in-utero when this was distilled.

Balblair distillery is in Edderton and has been running since 1895. The distillery and production methods have changed very little over the years.

This bottling is the marriage of two bourbon casks, #245 and #246.

Nose: Dusty fruity sherbet powder. Creamy. Waxy green apples, limes, a strawberry fool. Grilled pineapple. Lots of sweet vanilla oak. Honeysuckle blossom. Wet peppermint leaves, and a touch of fresh basil. Very classy – clean, floral, and fruity.
Palate: Wafts of honey with an undertone of muscavado sugar and caramel. There’s a rising tingle of baking spices and a tang of pineapple juice with nutmeg and cream. Overall it’s very round and soft. Gentle.
Finish: Gingerbread and black pepper with fresh hazelnuts.

An absolute belter, this. I love old bourbon matured whisky and this has all the hallmarks with a sweet vanilla creaminess and some gorgeous fruit notes.

This is available for a very reasonable £192 from The Whisky Exchange. Cracking price for a 30 year old whisky of this quality.


screen-shot-2016-11-19-at-19-46-08Smith’s Glenlivet 1974

Cask: Bourbon and Sherry refills
Age: 33 years old
Distilled: 1974
Bottled: 18th February 2008
ABV: 43%

Our second whisky is Smith’s own “The Glenlivet”. This distillery came to typify Speyside so much that other distilleries added “Glenlivet” to their names for many years.

Nose: Dried apricots, sticky prunes, sandalwood, paprika. A completely different beast to the Balblair with a noticeable (but not overstated) sherry influence.
Palate: A lovely fruit progression: Freshly squeezed orange becoming soft mango, then revealing stewed plums that evolve into tart blackberries. Wow! Blackberry jelly with black pepper – very dark. Oily and custard-like on the tongue.
Finish: Dry tobacco, dark chocolate, and blueberries.

Poised and gracefully balanced. The sherry here really enhances the spirit, adding a lot of dark fruit notes to what seems to be a light and citrusy core spirit. Loverly stuff.

You can pick this up for £408 on The Whisky Exchange.


screen-shot-2016-11-19-at-19-48-29Glen Grant 1966

Cask: Four refill bourbon casks, 1 first-fill sherry
Age: 45 years old
Distilled: 1966
Bottled: 16th July 2012
ABV: 40%

Here’s a whisky that came off the still in 1966, the year The Beatles released “Strawberry Fields”, “When I’m Sixty Four” and “Penny Lane” and I believe also some important English sporting victory…

Nose: Loads of fresh fruit here. Fresh melon slices, kiwi, Golden Delicious apples. Lychee and fizzy oak. Car air freshener. A touch of celery in there, oddly.
Palate: This is insanely good. Like an oak-aged can of Lilt. Pineapple fritters, bon-bons, lemon sherbets, green tea, candied oranges and a ton of soft, creamy oak.
Finish: It lasts, and lasts. Fruit creams, white chocolate, brown sugar. Drying, ashy oak.

This is like an unpeated Port Ellen. Wow, wow, and wow. Easily, easily, the best whisky of the line-up for my money with some incredible tropical fruit notes and it’s oh-so-smooth and easy to drink. One word review: phwoar.

This is a total bargain at £585 from the Whisky Exchange, and I really mean that. You’ll not find a whisky pushing fifty years old of this quality for less.


screen-shot-2016-11-19-at-19-49-52Strathisla 1965

Cask: 1st Fill Sherry
Age: 50 years old
Distilled: 9th December 1965
Bottled: 20th January 2016
ABV: 43%

Onto the seriously elderly whiskies now with the Strathisla 1965 – a fifty year old that was filled into a single 1st-fill sherry puncheon.

You don’t see a great deal of Strathisla about – the distillery bottlings can be found in the shops but a lot of the output goes into blends, particularly Chivas Regal.

So how’s fifty years in sherry going to flavour the spirit?

Nose: Big, big sherry. Wax, chestnuts, crystallised ginger and wood polish. Supermarket cola, Medjool dates, dark rum, black liqourice, coffee beans and old waxed leather.
Palate: Raspberry syrup, herbal tea. Very, very drying indeed. Mince pies with a lot of cloves. Bitter marmalade on granary bread. Cocoa dust.
Finish: Cloves with oak and black pepper.

Great nose but bitter on the finish. Alas, I think too much time in the cask here, much as it’s a delight to taste a whisky of this vintage. It has to be the classiest and most important sherry bomb I’ve ever tasted…. yet.

Again, The Whisky Exchange comes to the rescue offering this ancient Strathisla at £658.


screen-shot-2016-11-19-at-20-03-03Mortlach 1954

Cask: 1st fill sherry butt
Age: 58 years old
Distilled: 27th January 1954
Bottled: 20th November 2012
ABV: 43%

Here’s the grand finalé – a staggering 58 year old whisky from Mortlach that was distilled in the year that rationing finally ended after the second world war.

Interestingly, the spirit is almost triple-distilled (2.81, to be precise, because the distillery’s six stills are different shapes and sizes!). I wonder how that’ll effect such an extended maturation.

Nose: Loads of sherry but very different to the Strathisla. There’s a lovely salty quality with musty damp wood. Some typical sherry dark fruits: plums, dates, figs. Honeyed ham, oil paints, cold ashes, mossy dry stone walls. Mint leaves and blackberry jam. Gosh… this is astonishing.
Palate: Oooh, yes. Dry and floral. Tobacco leaves with blackcurrant and strawberries. Sloe gin. There’s a core of violet petals lurking in there and it just jumps right out at you! A rush of barrel spice – nutmeg and sweet baked peppers.
Finish: Fruity smoke, cranberries and cured cheeses.

This isn’t a tired cask – it’s still kicking! And not your typical sherry bomb either; there’s a great earthy and savoury complexity running through the floral, fruity surroundings. Very impressive indeed.

If you feel like buying a whisky distilled when Churchill was still the Prime Minister then trot over to Whisky Online and pony up a mere £1,500 for a piece of liquid history.


Thanks!

Wow, what a journey this has been. Thanks so much to Gordon & Macphail for sharing these pieces of history with us and, as ever, thanks to Steve Rush for organising yet another triumphant tasting.

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Wemyss Tweet Tasting: Batch Strength Editions

 

Oh, I do love what those folks at Wemyss Malts do. Their single cask bottlings are exceptional and their core range of blends is excellent.

So what about a cask strength line up of those core range blends? Ooooh, do tell me more. I was lucky enough to be on the tasting last year where they introduced the standard editions. It’s going to be fun tasting them at full cask strength!

The Hive Batch Strength 001

screen-shot-2016-11-09-at-22-35-12Bottler: Wemyss Malts
Age: NAS
ABV: 54.5%

In to start with is the cask strength counterpart to Wemyss’ “The Hive” blend, a sweet honeyed dram that’ll have all the Highland malt fans sitting up and paying attention.

Nose: Surprisingly…honey! That light, runny supermarket stuff. Boiled toffee sweets. Menthol. Throat sweets. A whiff of the coast with wax jacket, salty air, and chalky cliffs. There’s an orangey, beery thing happening. Like a pint of Blue Moon with a slice of orange in it. Very three dimensional.
Palate: Sweet, exuberant, and spicy. Honeycomb, yellow sultanas, menthol, and sweet fizzing oak. Orange pith. Waxy and luscious on the tongue.
Finish: Easter egg chocolate, more runny honey and a tingly black pepper numbness.

It’s young and kicking this one. Lots of fun to drink and with bags more going on than it’s bottle strength counterpart.

 

Spice King Batch Strength 001

screen-shot-2016-11-09-at-22-34-56Bottler: Wemyss Malts
Age:
NAS
ABV: 
56%

Up next is the Spice King, a very popular blend since its release a few years ago. So how is the full cask strength edition compared with the standard release?

Nose: Meaty with a sweet edge. A strong, peppery, smoky quality, too. Salt and pepper pork ribs. Dark, sticky prunes. Chargrilled pineapple. Salted caramel cake served with roast potatoes (weird, yes, but good weird). Wow.
Palate: Toffee apples with sweet cinnamon. Warm vanilla syrup. Cigar tobacco, mellow oak, smooth caramel. Not as spicy as the name would lead you to think!
Finish: Warm, long, and comforting. Rice pudding with nutmeg. Faint oak.

This is a lovely, complex, rich whisky that warms the cockles of your heart.

Peat Chimney Batch Strength 001

screen-shot-2016-11-09-at-22-34-39Bottler: Wemyss Malts
Age: NAS
ABV: 57%

The final dram is the heavily peated “Peat Chimney” blend – an Islay blend special with a ton of beautiful smoky notes to enjoy.

Nose: Cured gammon over a pine log fire. Smoky and sweet. Roasted sweetcorn. Black coffee with cloves and treacle. A touch of o-zone with muddy boots and dry stone walls.
Palate: Boom! There’s the peat. Burnt lemons, followed by caramelised seaweed coated in hot butter. A mug of Ovaltine. Wafts of dry, hot smoke revealing sweet plum flesh and chilli peppers.
Finish: Very tingly, almost chewy peat. Cashew nuts and sweet peppers.

Oh yes. This is a rush. Loads of peat but balanced so well by a host of complementary flavours. I really do like this.

 

Rob Roy Cocktail

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And finally… Wemyss have treated us Tweet Tasters to a pre-mixed cocktail: A Rob Roy made using the heavily peated Peat Chimney blend.

In a nutshell: Sweet smoky cherries. The smoke really balances the sweetness and the cherry bitters and PX give it a rounded texture and complexity. Very compelling indeed. I’m not usually a cocktail drinker but this is very pleasant… Bravo!

As ever, many thanks to Steve Rush at The Whisky Wire for organising and thank you to Wemyss Malts for letting us taste your lovely blends. All the blends are available to buy from Wemyss’ directly.